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The Right to Protection

Migrants entering and living in South Africa are often intimidated and threatened. Reports of the destruction of identity papers are frequent as are delays in the documentation process.

The Right to Protection

MIGRATION IN BRIEF

Migrants entering and living in South Africa are often intimidated and threatened. Reports of the destruction of identity papers are frequent as are delays in the documentation process. Xenophobia persists; women migrants are subject to gender-based violence resulting in high rates of HIV infection. Unaccompanied child migrants are vulnerable to attack and human trafficking. The South African Constitution provides for migrants to enjoy the same protection as local citizens, but many remain unaware of these rights. South Africa receives more asylum seekers than any other country in the world with people mainly coming from Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Somalia, as well as from countries further afield to escape poverty, insecurity and political turmoil.1 In recent years Refugee Reception Offices were closed in Johannesburg and Port Elizabeth, in spite of civil society having won two cases against their closure. The government has kept these offices closed. Ongoing litigation continues on the closure of the Cape Town Refugee Reception Office in June 2012.

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The Law
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Interviews
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The Project